Jacques-Louis David and the French Revolution | Essays

The modern democracy is a beloved topic in both national and international media. More often than not, one is referred to the realisation of that particular modern form of state and whether that concept has been used right by our peers. To understand the origins of the values of democracies, we need to go back to the era what is often referred as the beginning of modern democracy: the French Revolution. The French Revolution is a thankful subject voor cultural scientists all over the planet. The last years a variety books have been written on the French Revolution and the symbolism of that period, have been written, each with their own innovative perspective. However, literature is not the only form where we could learn about the French Revolution. Art is another form of expression where we can see the symbolism of the French Revolution. One of the most celebrated artists of that specific era, was the French artist Jacques-Louis David, whose name is known because of his paintings. (Lajer-Burcharth, 1999). David is a very interesting persona in history, no historian would tell you otherwise. Not just for the fact that he is seen as very important painter, but also because he has been one of the most prolific political activist artists during the French Revolution. (Robert, 1989). As one of the so-called forefathers of neoclassicism, his work is depicted as symbolical for the French Revolution. In this article efforts are made to to research David’s political conviction and how his paintings have been influenced by this conviction, in particular the Oath of the Horatii.
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Searching my Identity | Opinion

When I was in my first year of university I was attending a lecture about cultural identity. It was very illuminating, because it was the first time I connected identity and nationalism to one another. This might not seem like a very illogical thing to do, but it opened my eyes. The thing that spoke to me the most is the fact that how you define your identity, will ultimately form your nationalism. I never thought about my identity other than that it must include ‘the self’. By being asked whether I felt a citizen of the Netherlands, Europe or the World, I started actively thinking about what my identity is.
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What I love about Liverpool | Travel

1. National Express is chill. I arrived in the UK at Manchester Airport, because it was cheaper for me. I saved over 80,-! Now I needed to get to Liverpool and I booked a seat at National Express, I was so surprised. We don’t really have those kind of services, back here in the Netherlands and it was such a good experience. I felt pretty comfortable.

2. Football. You were probably waiting for me talk about football, weren’t you? Of course Liverpool and Everton are the biggest teams in Merseyside, but if you want semi-professional nonleague football, you are in the right place too! There’s Tranmere Rover and Southport in the National League (5th tier), Marine and Prescot Cables in the Northern Premier League Premier Division (7th tier) and Northern Premier League Division One North (8th tier). It’s brilliant! If you can visit a nonleague club in your life, it will open your eyes.

3. Albert Dock. After an intense football match on the Saturday, we went for a bit of typical sightseeing. After walking past very modern stores and shops, we got to the Albert Dock and it is profoundly beautiful. Now I know there are many views on what beauty is, but it was so calming and so rich of culture. I love how Liverpool has progressed over the years, but still have eye for the history of their city. It made me feel very comfortable and very excited to be honest. It was great to feel the wind in your face and feel the sunshine, made me feel alive.

4. Pubs. I love a good pub and Liverpool’s got loads. There is nothing better than go the pub after a nice walk and go in for food and a drink. The atmosphere of a British pub is something you can’t describe. It’s something so typical and great, I’m smiling as I’m writing this. Love being in pubs, hearing the different voices and seeing different football and rugby matches. I think I’ve visited over 30 pubs and it made my life so much better. Life is great.

5. Accents. When you are traveling to another country and you are the one that speaks English the best, you are bound to be called ‘The Translator’ and that’s exactly what happened with me. Now I love a good accent and the Scouse accent is one of purest out there. I love being surrounded with people speaking freely and being passionate about their region. The accents really do give me a good feeling.

Have you ever visited Liverpool? What did you like the most about Liverpool? 
Marc
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